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Volunteer Spotlight


Volunteer Spotlight: Jeri Spurling

Jeri Spurling is the co-host of The Jazz Scene, Monday nights from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, alternating weeks with her co-host, William Ryan.  On the program she loosely follows a musical arc that begins with jazz selections that she refers to as “upbeat and peppy,” then on to calmer tempos around dinnertime, and finishing off with “edgier, funky, or raucous jazz to blend towards the blues at 8:00.”  Jeri aims for the show to have continuity and occassionally there will a theme, but she says that “the ear trumps all requirements.  It has to flow and sound good.” Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Sara Elena Chiri

"In January I sat down to talk with WERU programmer Sara Elena Chiri about her music and her thoughts, concerning everything from station affiliation to what makes life meaningful. What resulted was a poetic testament to the power of music and voices. Sara Elena is one of the hosts of Gracias a la Vida (Saturdays 11am-1pm)." The other volunteer hosts are Susana Diaz, Luz Mary Kogson, Cheo and William Ryan. ~ Max Eddington, WERU Intern (College of the Atlantic)

"Gracias a la Vida is a show where we try to make a mixture of the Latin rhythms. It doesn’t need to be salsa only, which is the most famous and popular around, I know that. We play different types of styles, like the music everywhere: cumbia, meringue, romantic music." ~ Sara Elena  Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Sarah O’Malley, Host of World Around Us

Sarah O'Malley is the longtime host of WERU's World Around Us, a weekly (Saturdays at 8:30AM) science and nature short feature show.  Sarah is a Maine native, having grown up in quiet North Castine where she fondly remembers summers spent running around in the woods and biking the four miles into town.  Sarah attended George Stevens Academy in nearby Blue Hill.  Sarah currently resides in Sedgwick with her two dogs, two cats, chickens, and her mountain guide husband, Dick Chasse.  Sarah’s extended family still live in the Castine area, and she has the good fortune of enjoying being an aunt to niece,Caitlin and nephew,Will.  Regular listeners might recognize Caitlin from her guest stints on World Around Us.  Sarah teaches Ocean Science at Maine Maritime Academy in Castine. Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Sue Mackey Andrews, Host of Family Corner

Sue Mackey Andrews is the host of WERU’s Family Corner, which airs on the 4th Wednesday of each month from 10 to 11 am.

Who is Sue Mackey Andrews (in her own words)?

I have lived in Dover-Foxcroft since 1979, and am married to a terrific guy with two equally terrific adult daughters. Piscataquis County is a great place to live! I am active in fundraising for a volunteer hospice organization, serve on the county’s economic development council, and am a member of Helping Hands with Heart, a regional collaborative focusing on improving the lives of families, children and seniors in our rural county. Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Jay Peterson

We asked Jay Peterson a number of questions so that listeners can get to know him a bit better. Jay is the engaging and knowledgeable host of our Friday afternoon, 2:00-4:00 program on WERU, The Rhythm Ranch.  Here’s what he had to say for himself:

“I moved to Maine in the winter of 2002, and the family followed in March. I started at WERU in the fall of '02 as part of the rotation on the Saturday Morning Coffeehouse, then moved into the Come Sunday rotation, and then to The Rhythm Ranch is '05 or so. I think I have been on the air on almost every day of the week! February 6 marked the 500th edition of The Rhythm Ranch."   Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Kristie Billings

Kristie Billings could be the girl the Heads were singing about in "Punk Lolita."  She is free spirited, unedited and unapologetically herself.  Not to mention her distinctly punk aesthetic.  As Kristie tells it, she marched to a different beat early on.  On Saturdays at 6PM, you can hear her on WERU as one of the hosts of Daydream Nation.  Kristie plays an eclectic mix of everything:  punk, blues, rock 'n' roll, reggae, Motown, 1980's.  "Whatever," she says, "I feel like busting out that night!" Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Elaine Shute

You can hear programmer Elaine Shute when she takes her turn at the helm of On the Wing on Monday's at WERU.  Elaine says she wanted to be a DJ ever since she could remember but was too introverted as a kid to imagine being on the air. Instead she became an art major, envying the kids running the college radio station. She describes subbing for On the Wing and eventually getting her own show as fulfilling a dream. Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Holly McFaul

If you've had the good fortune to meet Holly McFaul, one half of WERU's reigning mother and daughter programmer duo, you inevitably walk away feeling like you've just made a new friend. Holly, a Virginia native, has resided in Belfast with her husband Andy and daughter Pip for the last 8 years. The ultimate cool mom, Holly can be found at WERU on Saturday evenings, scouring the new music for Pip friendly finds, while Pip takes to the air on The Junk Drawer.  Holly is an on air talent in her own right as one of the rotating hosts of the Sunday Morning Coffee House. Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Pip McFaul

Pip is not only the daughter half of WERU's only mother and daughter programmer duo, but at 15, she is also the youngest programmer at WERU.  Every Saturday from 8 to 10PM, you can tune in to WERU FM to hear Pip host her show The Junk Drawer. It is no surprise to those who know her that Pip is a ground breaker.  From her varied interests to her eclectic taste in music, Pip has always gone her own way! Read more »

Volunteer Spotlight: Atomic Mama

In November 2013, WERU FM welcomed new DJ Atomic Mama, host of Blue Hill Blues on WERU FM on Tuesdays from 2 to 4 pm.  We caught up with Atomic Mama recently and asked her to share some of her thoughts on the blues.

What does the Blues mean to you? I do not subscribe to an acoustic definition of the blues. By this I mean that just because "somebody can play the chords" (and there are basically only three chords) -- that makes their music "blues" and is now a bygawd-furreal blues artist. I consider the blues "an art with its own historical, cultural, economic, psychological, and political determinants" . . . and, by definition, "the blues was and will always be a black American working-class music, in spite of the number of white performers who adopt the genre as their own." I quote Living Blues Magazine co-editor Paul Garon, from an editorial published in 1973. Of course -- there are exceptions: Charlie Musselwhite and Harmonica Frank come to mind. Read more »

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